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Director, ED, Trauma, Behavioral Health
Department: Trauma Services-E
Schedule: Full-Time
Shift: Day
Job Details:

Monday - Friday, weekend coverage as needed, day shift, 80 hours per two-week pay period, East Campus.

Position Title: Director, ED, Trauma, and Behavioral Health
Department: Trauma Services

Purpose: Provides leadership for the strategic and operational direction for the Trauma Program, Emergency Services, and the Intensive Care Units.  Key accountabilities include:  Establish safety as a core value; ensure that quality assurance/performance improvement plans promote excellence in patient outcomes; maintain personnel compliance with regulatory and professional standards; foster interdisciplinary collaborative relationships; oversight of human, fiscal, material and environmental resources; and supervision of activities related to maintaining GMC as Iowa Level II Regional Trauma Facility in collaboration with the Trauma Program Medical Director.

Report To: Vice President, Patient Services (Chief Nurse Executive)

Supervisory Responsibility: Divisional/Multi-Level: The job requires direct responsibility for the management of multiple departments with large numbers of staff assigned to each.  The incumbent directly and indirectly supervises multiple directors, managers, assistant managers, and/or supervisors who in turn manage and supervise their areas of responsibility. Incumbent has multiple shift responsibility for staff.

Materials Responsibility: High:  Work requires a high degree of responsibility for material resources.  Examples of resources could include large operating or capital budgets for a large functional area, major plants, facilities or properties, or  other equivalent material assets.  The employee has a large amount of control over these resources.  The cost of errors might result in significant financial loss and affect overall corporate results.  The difficulty, variety and depth of problems associated with these material resources is moderately complex.

Key Relationship: Co-workers/Health System Employees, Outside Agencies/Other Health Care Providers, Patients, Families, and Significant Others, Physicians/Medical Office Staff, General Public/Visitors/Volunteers, Vendors/Clients, Auditors/Review Agencies, News Media.


Education: Master's Degree

Field Of Study: Nursing or Health Care Administration or related field, with one degree being in nursing

Training Preferred: Certification in Emergency, Trauma or Nursing Administration

Licensure/Registration: Registered Nurse in Iowa

Experience: More than 3 years experience required.

Interpersonal Skills: Interaction is with a wide variety of people inside or outside the organization. Communications are often extremely difficult or stressful in nature. Contact with others involves highly complex and sensitive topics. The job requires extremely well developed interpersonal skills for dealing with a range of complicated problem situations. The job requires the use of diverse communication techniques.

Physical Demands: Low Intensity: Work requires a light or low amount of physical exertion. The job requirements for manual dexterity or physical manipulation are limited.  The need for physical stamina and endurance is of minimal or low significance.  The degree of physical strain produced on the job is somewhat taxing, but does not usually produce fatigue and require periods of rest.  Freedom of movement exists, and the job does not confine the employee to a prescribed body posture.  Body movement usually involves sitting and intermittent walking.  The position exceeds these demands occasionally, 10-35% of the time.

Working Conditions: There is limited exposure to highly adverse environmental conditions including physical hazards, health and safety risks, and otherwise undesirable characteristics in the environment.  Personal risks require safety equipment or precautions to be followed closely but the time the employee may be exposed to these conditions is limited to 10% or less of the work day.

Possible Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogens: Yes


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